milk in tea - a critical analysis
#1

droid Wrote:People who put the milk in before the tea and water, etc...

thats because many moons ago the cups that tea used to be drank from couldnt take the heat of boiling water, so a splash of milk was added to reduce the temperature a bit
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#2

Fada Wrote:
droid Wrote:People who put the milk in before the tea and water, etc...

thats because many moons ago the cups that tea used to be drank from couldnt take the heat of boiling water, so a splash of milk was added to reduce the temperature a bit

that's a really good explanation Xyxthumbs Hahaha
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#3

Its still wrong.

Deeply wrong.
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#4

Oh and also - wouldn't that apply only to super fine china? I'm sure ceramics have been capable of holding boiling water for millennia.
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#5

i think its old earthenware pots
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#6

http://www.electricscotland.com/food/jsi...istory.htm

its in there somewhere
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#8

ah yeh

"When china was first used for tea, it was very delicate. Milk was put into the cup first to keep it from cracking when the hot liquid was poured in"
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#9

Lol But its a reputable site! Wink
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#10

wikipedias shitting itself
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#11

Hahaha
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#12

droidicus

Could you explain your aversion to milk before water?

I find the technique especially usefull when you're making a brew for quite a few peeople, you dont have a teapot, several of them like it quite weak (another discussion altogether), and otherwise the bags might be brewing too long.

Also, easier to control strength via baq squeezes than milk pouring no? A lot of room for error with milk pouring at the final stage....
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#13

There's a theory that the milk blocks the perforation of the tea bags and I used to go by the way of milk added last. However over extended testing at work and at home I taste no discernable difference between the two methods.

Thur I concur with Scope that when making tea for a big group I'll happily do milk before the teabag is out.
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#14

Hahaha
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#15

it's more scientific to put the milk in afterwards, since you can stir it while doing so to ensure the desired amount by considering the changing colour of the tea

[Image: tea.gif]
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#16

the only problem with milk last is, what if you add too much milk by accident

and if youve allready thrown the teabag in the bin

now youve gotta drink a cup of overly milky tea, or use another teabag which is just wasteful
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#17

Some good advice here.
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#18

that's why its a skill...kind of like getting the eggs just right.
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#19

Fada Wrote:the only problem with milk last is, what if you add too much milk by accident

and if youve allready thrown the teabag in the bin

now youve gotta drink a cup of overly milky tea, or use another teabag which is just wasteful

It becomes second nature. Only amateurs over-pour the milk. For shame i say.
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#20

Wilshy Wrote:There's a theory that the milk blocks the perforation of the tea bags and I used to go by the way of milk added last. However over extended testing at work and at home I taste no discernable difference between the two methods.

Thur I concur with Scope that when making tea for a big group I'll happily do milk before the teabag is out.

You and Scope are mental. This makes no sense to me. Nervous

Surely when making tea for a large group, the only way to judge how much milk they want is to add it after you've poured the water? Otherwise youre just adding an arbitrary amount in advance as its very hard to get right otherwise.

I judge the strength of the tea by its colour (including squeeze if necessary) and then ideally hand the cup and add milk as required for each person, also judging by colour. That seems like the most precise way to me.
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#21

Milk in tea = waste of a good cuppa Wink
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#22

droid Wrote:You and Scope are mental. This makes no sense to me. Nervous

Surely when making tea for a large group, the only way to judge how much milk they want is to add it after you've poured the water? Otherwise youre just adding an arbitrary amount in advance as its very hard to get right otherwise.

I judge the strength of the tea by its colour (including squeeze if necessary) and then ideally hand the cup and add milk as required for each person, also judging by colour. That seems like the most precise way to me.

See Rentboys comment on it amateur milk pouring type scenario Wink

Seriously I just know when it's enough milk. Occasionally it's very slightly too milky, occasionally it's very slightly too strong. But there's no harm in that. As longs as it's not too far either way, creosote or cup of milk, then all's well.
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#23

Milk last you turds.

How is the tea gonna brew in properly when you add cold milk first?
Also how is the sugar (if you use it, I do, yes I am the anti-christ) solute in cold milk?

Curse you all.
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#24

Wilshy Wrote:
droid Wrote:You and Scope are mental. This makes no sense to me. Nervous

Surely when making tea for a large group, the only way to judge how much milk they want is to add it after you've poured the water? Otherwise youre just adding an arbitrary amount in advance as its very hard to get right otherwise.

I judge the strength of the tea by its colour (including squeeze if necessary) and then ideally hand the cup and add milk as required for each person, also judging by colour. That seems like the most precise way to me.

See Rentboys comment on it amateur milk pouring type scenario Wink

Seriously I just know when it's enough milk. Occasionally it's very slightly too milky, occasionally it's very slightly too strong. But there's no harm in that. As longs as it's not too far either way, creosote or cup of milk, then all's well.

Tsch!! You might know how you like it - what about how someone else likes it? Eek

Law reminds me of a proper scientific point though - cooling down the water with milk as the tea is brewing isn't good. that water has to be boiling...
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#25

The long and short of it is, cold milk has no place touching a teabag.
Ever.
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