Lithuania
#1

I've been fascinated by Lithuania lately because of their long history of occupation and independence. Also because Lithuanian is the oldest living Indo-European language, which is to say that it is closest to what the original I-E language sounded like.

Any Subverts ever been there? Any tidbits about the place/people to share?
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#2

My memory tells me fellow subvert widhzit is from the Baltics? Maybe he will weigh in Smile
Music critic for the Tally Ho
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#3

I was hoping he would Smile He's from Estonia if I remember right, different culturally and linguistically but yeah I hope he's about.
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#4

Yes. I'm about (thanks Statto for pointing me to the thread).

I've been to Lithuania several times, worked closely with some Lithuanians (my boss was Lithuanian), know some Lithuanians living here in Estonia.

Of course, because of our shared history of Soviet occupation, all three Baltic states are sort of alike and always have tried to stick together. That, of course, doesn't work all the time. Lithuanians like to remind, if possible, that they used to have a kingdom and one of the largest countries of that period. They also have most religious people of all three Baltic States. Lithuanians have stronger ties with Poland, because of shared border and history.

During Soviet times, as I have heard from older generation, many Lithuanians were eager to help and work with Russians, especially with those in power. Interestingly enough, now there is smallest Russian community of all Baltic countries (Estonia 25%, Latvia 27%, Lithuania 6%). Also, during recent years Lithuanian politicians have been loudest to warn about Russian threat.

Language is interesting but also rather difficult. It is very close to Latvian, but very different from Estonian. Probably most used word is 'gerai' with translates as 'ok' or 'good'.
Their family name or surname usually shows your status/availability - men and women have different surname and woman has different name depending if she is married or not (man Cinilis, married woman Ciunene, their unmarried daughter Ciunite).

What else? Just ask, I might know, or might not Icon_razz
And I probably could tell more about Estonia Wink
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#5

Thanks Wiz! Wave

Did Estonia become closer to the other Baltic States (Lith, Lat) because of the deoccupation from Russia? I was reading that Estonia has a long history of Viking contact as the country is sitting right on the entrance to the corridor that connects the Baltic Sea to 'Eastern Europe.'

For an Estonian, is it easy to tell the difference between a Lithuanian and a Latvian?

Sorry, these might be silly questions Lol
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#6

In a way, yeah. Because of a common goal to achieve independence. Though being neighbours, there's always been interaction between countries and people. There was also a small region between Latvia and Estonia, called Livonia. People spoke Finnic language there, but it had many connections with Latvian language, too.

About Vikings - Estonia, particularly island of Saaremaa, had their own Viking-alike thing going for many centuries. They usually invaded Swedish shores and fought back (or traded) with other Vikings in the region.

I'm not sure, how easy is it for Estonians to tell difference. I usually have to listen to more carefully before knowing, which they are. I certainly knew better, when I was closely working with people of both nations.

And these are not silly questions! As a member of a small country/nation, I'm used to explaining where I'm from and that it's an actual place, not a made-up-land. Wink
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#7

(16th December 2016, 08:11)widzhit Wrote: And these are not silly questions! As a member of a small country/nation, I'm used to explaining where I'm from and that it's an actual place, not a made-up-land. Wink

Hahaha Very true.


So, as a linguist the one question I have to ask you is if you know anything about the 'Language Police' that the Lithuanian govt. created to preserve their language? As someone who lives in a deoccupied Baltic country, what do you think about that?

Did Estonia do anything like that or how did your country transition out of the Soviet occupation after 1990?

Wish we could just sit and have a beer! Pint
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#8

Had some good times in Lithuania, nice people. Love the music.

Will be off there for a mate's stag do next year, good times for sure :henrykelly:
[Image: protabl3.gif]
Don Cherry Wrote:Every human is blessed in her or his life with one love (passion), no matter how long it may last. This Absolute love will last in one's heart and soul forever.
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#9

(20th December 2016, 02:24)Macc Wrote: Had some good times in Lithuania, nice people. Love the music.

What music in particular did you like? Smile
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#10

I lived 6 months in Lithuania. It was okay, but I honestly can't say it fascinated me. The people are all very generous and friendly though.

Most impressive thing was however how good looking the women are.
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#11

(20th December 2016, 13:27)TimeTouristDnB Wrote: Most impressive thing was however how good looking the women are.

Noticed that in Belgium, Ghent to be precise. Very boring country imo Oops (mostly saw the highway to be frank, so don't quote me on that) ... but every single woman I met there looked gorgeous.
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#12

Actually I haven't heard about that language police. We have language inspection, that can fine companies, if they don't follow the language law (which makes it sound exactly like police).

Estonia has quite strict language policy, too. Local Russians are not happy about that at all, always giving Finland as an example (they have Swedish as second official language). Russian schools can teach in Russian only first 9 grades (students get 16 years old by that time) and high school is all Estonian.
In the beginning of the 80-s, minister of education wanted to do a school reform and make all Estonian schools Russian speaking only. Some students loudly protested this and luckily the idea was abandoned. Ironically, both Russian and Estonian schools have quite lousy quality of another language teaching. Meaning Estonians speak hardly any Russian (even back in Soviet time) and Russians don't speak any Estonian (they just don't want to, with few examples).

And yes, it'd be way easier to discuss/explain this all over some drinks Grin
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#13

(20th December 2016, 13:27)TimeTouristDnB Wrote: Most impressive thing was however how good looking the women are.

That's the whole Baltics and Eastern Europe region to ya. Estonia particularly is the mixture of Scandinavian, Russian/Slavic and German.
Also, this region has the tallest women in the world: http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-36888541
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#14

(20th December 2016, 15:16)cycom Wrote:
(20th December 2016, 13:27)TimeTouristDnB Wrote: Most impressive thing was however how good looking the women are.

... but every single woman I met there looked gorgeous.

Icon_razz Icon_razz Icon_razz
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#15

(21st December 2016, 08:10)widzhit Wrote: Actually I haven't heard about that language police. We have language inspection, that can fine companies, if they don't follow the language law (which makes it sound exactly like police).

Estonia has quite strict language policy, too. Local Russians are not happy about that at all, always giving Finland as an example (they have Swedish as second official language). Russian schools can teach in Russian only first 9 grades (students get 16 years old by that time) and high school is all Estonian.
In the beginning of the 80-s, minister of education wanted to do a school reform and make all Estonian schools Russian speaking only. Some students loudly protested this and luckily the idea was abandoned. Ironically, both Russian and Estonian schools have quite lousy quality of another language teaching. Meaning Estonians speak hardly any Russian (even back in Soviet time) and Russians don't speak any Estonian (they just don't want to, with few examples).

And yes, it'd be way easier to discuss/explain this all over some drinks Grin

That's super cool, in a very draconian way Lol

At least you all didn't lose your language to Russian speakers and occupiers. Xyxthumbs I know that Estonian and Finnish are closely related as Uralic languages. Thanks Wiz for the knowledge!
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#16

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